In the News

In the News: Neighborhoods or Regions? A Trick Question

By: Josh Ishimatsu, Director of Capacity Building and Research at National CAPACD
From: Shelterforce

There is a narrative out there about how much of community development has lost its soul—community development has become too much about Development and not enough about Community, too concerned with efficient production of affordable housing and not concerned enough about social change, not engaged enough in creating a more caring, more connected, more just world. This narrative says that for community development to continue to be vital and relevant, it needs to return to its roots—its grassroots—and be more about organizing, more progressive, more explicitly about social and economic justice, less about Trump-esque deal making. Individual CDCs should be more neighborhood-based, with a deeper, more direct connection to their neighborhoods.

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In the News: Are Big Banks Keeping Their Promises to Homeowners?

By Janis Bowdler, NCLR; Cy Richardson, National Urban League; and Lisa Hasegawa, National CAPACD
 
Are Big Banks Keeping Their Promises to Homeowners?
New Report Highlights Mixed Compliance
 
On Wednesday, we got an inside look into whether or not the big banks have kept their promise to our families. National Mortgage Settlement Monitor Joseph A. Smith, Jr. released his compliance report which details how the five largest banks that entered into a $25 billion settlement on account of fraudulent robo-signing have carried out their end of the bargain. The results are mixed.
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In the News: Scale-up? Not So Fast

By Josh Ishimatsu, Director of Capacity Building and Reserach at National CAPACD
From: Rooflines

I get nervous when people start talking about community development needing larger economies of scale. I understand that more units can make a tax credit housing project proforma work better, but bigger is not always better. Not that I think increasing scale is immediately and always wrong, but I think we need to be careful about pushing demands for scale beyond what is cognitively and socially sustainable. I also worry that we fetishize counting widgets produced to the detriment of an understanding that building community is fundamentally about relationships.
 
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In the News: Foreclosure settlement monitor faces critics

By Jon Prior
 
Joseph Smith, the monitor of a controversial government settlement with the five largest banks last year, said he was lucky to survive Wednesday meetings with homeowner advocates who feel let down by the deal, which was meant to end past foreclosure abuses.
 
The former North Carolina banking commissioner admitted to real concerns with the $25 billion agreement struck between 49 state attorneys general, the Justice Department and the Housing and Urban Development Department, and asked advocates at the meeting — hosted by the National Council of La Raza — to help him keep track of which mortgage servicers aren’t living up to their end of the bargain.
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In the News: Have Mortgage Settlements Left Communities of Color Behind?

By Janet Murguía, Marc H. Morial, and Lisa Hasegawa
 
This February marks the one-year anniversary of the $25 billion national mortgage settlement made with the nation’s five largest mortgage servicers: Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, and Ally Financial. Since then, the banks have barreled through their obligations at a rapid clip, leaving us with some concerns.
 
To explore the settlement’s progress, the Alliance for Stabilizing Our Communities, a partnership between the National Council of La Raza, the National Urban League, and the National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development, hosted a summit featuring Joseph A. Smith Jr., an independent monitor of the national mortgage settlement.
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In the News: Civil Rights Groups Call for More Disclosure in Mortgage Settlement

By Kate Berry
 
Civil rights groups and housing counselors sharply criticized the top five mortgage servicers Wednesday and vowed to force their executives to publicly disclose which consumers are benefitting from the $25 billion national mortgage settlement.
 
At a forum in Washington, housing counselors called the settlement "disastrous," and grilled its monitor, Joseph A. Smith, on why the banks are not disclosing data on race, ethnicity and geography that would show whether black and Hispanic communities hit hardest by the foreclosures crisis are getting the bulk of consumer relief.
 
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In the News: Struggling Asian American Homeowners Hesitate to Seek Help

By Devika Koppikar
From Asian Fortune

Jane Duong, National CAPACD's Director of Programs and Advocacy is quoted in Asian Fortune's article, "Struggling Asian American Homeowners Hesitate to Seek Help" on foreclosure rates of Asian American homeowners.

 

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In the News: Neighborhoods or Regions? A Trick Question

By: Josh Ishimatsu
 
There is a narrative out there about how much of community development has lost its soul—community development has become too much about Development and not enough about Community, too concerned with efficient production of affordable housing and not concerned enough about social change, not engaged enough in creating a more caring, more connected, more just world. This narrative says that for community development to continue to be vital and relevant, it needs to return to its roots—its grassroots—and be more about organizing, more progressive, more explicitly about social and economic justice, less about Trump-esque deal making. Individual CDCs should be more neighborhood-based, with a deeper, more direct connection to their neighborhoods.
 
There is another narrative that community development is, and has been, too provincial, too focused on specific projects and individual neighborhoods and, more cynically, too focused on the needs of individual organizations. This narrative says that community development needs to be more big-picture oriented, more regional and metropolitan in scale, more about what is economically and environmentally sustainable in the metro region. Individual CDCs should still be place-based, but the unit of geography should be a region, not a neighborhood.
 
These two visions of the current state of and future revival of community development are somewhat in tension, but that’s more because they’re not talking to each other than because they are incompatible.
 
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In the News: Coverage of the 2012 Asian American Election Eve Poll

As part of our AAPI Civic Engagement Project, National CAPACD, in partnership with the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), conducted the Asian American Election Eve Poll on the weekend before the November 6, 2012 presidential election.

2012 election ushers in historic wins for Asian-American candidates

by Kyung Lah
CNN
November 7, 2012

Asian Americans overwhelmingly backed Obama, Democrats
by Kim Geiger
Los Angeles Times
November 9, 2012

U.S. Election: The South Asian Factor

by Visi R. Tilak
Wall Street Journal
November 10, 2012

Asian-Americans backed Obama overwhelmingly
Boston Globe
by Callum Borchers and Alan Wirzbicki
November 9, 2012

Increasingly, New Face of Asian American Electorate is a Democrat
Ngoc Nguyen
New America Media
November 9, 2012

 

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In the News: Home for Good Campaign in Local Media

The Chinese American Service League (CASL) and the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation (PCDC), both Home for Good partnering organizations, werwe featured in local media in the past week few weeks.  
 
Check the links to see the full articles!
 
Chicago
 
Philadelphia

China News Weekend
Sing Tao Daily
Metro Chinese Weekly

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